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Photo#313444
Syrphidae  - Spilomyia citima

Syrphidae - Spilomyia citima
Beaverton, Washington County, Oregon, USA
August 1, 2009
Size: 15mm
Is this a Syrphid Hornet Mimic - Chrysotoxum ?

Thanks in Advance

Images of this individual: tag all
Syrphidae  - Spilomyia citima Syrphidae  - Spilomyia citima Syrphidae  - Spilomyia citima

Moved

Moved
Moved from Spilomyia foxleei.
Oh, but I've made a mistake, SORRY!
This is clearly S. citima, which has a downward facing tubercle similar to interrupta; foxleei has no tubercle. The yellow on the side of the thorax differs from both foxleei, and interrupta (see INFO page). Furthermore, your dorsal image shows the pattern as in citima.

This is a female Spilomyia interrupta -
I wonder why this was moved to species without having been identified.
S. foxleei is very similar, but has more yellow on the side of the thorax, and doesn't have a face with a ventrally produced tubercle.
Both species occur in OR. Nice pictures - I know they don't always hold still.

 
RE: I wonder
Pecavi. I do know the difference and should have looked more closely. Sorry for any confusion.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

You got two out of three, Eric.
Good thinking on the syrphid and mimic angles. But check the eyes a bit more closely. More like this one:

When you run across syrphids with odd eyes, first stop is subfamily Eristalinae. Keep at it!

 
closer?
Might even be close to This
What do you think?

 
Perfect, I'd say.
Nice work!

 
move it
Ok..I'll move it

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