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Species Dytiscus marginicollis - Giant Green Water Beetle

Bug For ID? #2 - Dytiscus marginicollis Dytiscus marginicollis LeConte - Dytiscus marginicollis - male Dytiscus.... - Dytiscus marginicollis - female Dytiscus.... - Dytiscus marginicollis - female Dytiscus marginicollis? - Dytiscus marginicollis Dytiscus marginicollis? - Dytiscus marginicollis Dytiscus marginicollis? - Dytiscus marginicollis Dytiscus marginicollis? - Dytiscus marginicollis - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Adephaga
Family Dytiscidae (Predaceous Diving Beetles)
Subfamily Dytiscinae
Genus Dytiscus
Species marginicollis (Giant Green Water Beetle)
Explanation of Names
Dytiscus marginicollis (LeConte 1845)
Size
26.7-33 mm (1)
Identification
Diagnosis (1)
body elongated and medium sized; colour reddish brown to black, sometimes with a greenish sheen
rounded metacoxal lobes
males with a median glabrous area on both mesotarsal segments 2 and 3
females with long protarsal claws (longer than protarsal segment 5) and dense punctation over apical (posterior) half of elytra
posterior yellow band of pronotum broad especially in the middle
Range
mainly western; in North America, from southern British Columbia east to Manitoba south to CA, AZ, and NM. Southernmost record was from Durango state in Mexico (1).
Habitat
Most halophilic member of the genus; found regularly in semipermanent saline ponds in grassland habitats (1), less commonly so in nonsaline permanent ponds (1); also reported from hot springs (NV, WY)(1); like other members of the genus, tends to occur at higher elevations in the southern parts of its range (e.g. 2500 m in AZ) (1)
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