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Species Eumenes fraternus - Fraternal Potter Wasp

wasp - Eumenes fraternus - male Potter Wasp - Eumenes fraternus Unid. Eumenes - Eumenes fraternus - female Eumenes fraternus Eumenes fraternus Eumenes fraternus black and white wasp - Eumenes fraternus Eumenes fraternus? - Eumenes fraternus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon (Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps)
Superfamily Vespoidea (Yellowjackets and Hornets, Paper Wasps; Potter, Mason and Pollen Wasps and allies)
Family Vespidae (Yellowjackets and Hornets, Paper Wasps; Potter, Mason and Pollen Wasps)
Subfamily Eumeninae (Potter and Mason Wasps)
Genus Eumenes
Species fraternus (Fraternal Potter Wasp)
Explanation of Names
Eumenes fraternus Say 1824
Size
15-20 mm
Identification
Out of the black-and-pale species of Eumenes, E. fraternus is distinguishable by its dark, evenly-pigmented wings.
Range
e NA (ON-NH-FL to MN-TX)(1)(2)
Habitat
Woodland edges and shrubby fields
Season
Apr-Nov in NC(3), Jul-Sep in MN
Life Cycle
Females lay egg in mud nest (built on twig, etc.), then provision with small caterpillars esp. cankerworms. Also reported to provision with sawflies.
Larva (with caterpillars) -- pupa -- adult

At least two generations a year, from late spring to early fall. Overwinters as prepupa in cells. --based on Richard Vernier's comments
Internet References
Video of wasp building a nest
Works Cited
1.Identification Atlas of the Vespidae (Hymenoptera, Aculeata) of the Northeastern Nearctic Region
Matthias Buck, Stephen A. Marshall, and David K. B. Cheung. 2008. Biological Survey of Canada [Canadian Journal of Arthropod Identification].
2.Taxonomic review of Eumenes Latreille, 1802 (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Eumeninae) from the New World
Grandinete Y.C., Noll F.B., Carpenter J. 2018. Zootaxa 4459: 1-52.
3.Insects of North Carolina
C.S. Brimley. 1938. North Carolina Department of Agriculture.