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Photo#325932
Vespula vidua

Vespula vidua
Brighton, Northumberland, Ontario, Canada
August 26, 2009
I thought this wasp was Vespula germanica but then I noticed that the base of the antennae is yellow, now I'm not sure. Could someone confirm please. Also would I be right in assuming that this wasp has put a hole in the base of the Jewelweed in order to reach the nectar?

How sneaky!
It is taking a shortcut and robbing nectar without pollinating the flower. I have seen this thievery many times, including some bumblebees; sometimes they are legitimate pollinators, others they cheat. Here and here.

 
Vespula vidua
Thanks Vespula and Eric for the ID and Beatriz for the info. I knew birds did this but it is the first time I have actually caught an insect in the act.
Naomi

 
Vespula vidua
Thanks Beatriz for the info. I knew birds did this but it is the first time I have actually caught an insect in the act.
Naomi

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Yellowjacket in the Genus Vespula
Almost certainly Vespula vidua, but I would still move it to Genus level to be safe

The wasp could very well have chewed that hole...

 
I'd confirm species.
I've seen a lot of these here in Amherst, MA the last few days, and the markings are consistent with vidua.

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