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Photo#326032
Garden Orb Spider - Araneus diadematus

Garden Orb Spider - Araneus diadematus
Stayton (20 miles SE of Salem), Marion County, Oregon, USA
August 25, 2009
Size: ~3/4"
Another online spider fan has identified this as a garden orb weaver spider... I'm interested in specifically which one? "She" (?) is living around & under the cedar shakes on the house next to my front door, and only comes out at night. She builds a large & very strong web & sits in it facing out until a meal happens by. If disturbed, she quickly retreats to the shake overhang & hides. She is literally "up against the wall", and I've only been able to photograph her underside... I've included one photo of her waiting for dinner and one of her encasing a moth caught in her web.

Images of this individual: tag all
Garden Orb Spider - Araneus diadematus Garden Orb Spider - Araneus diadematus

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Cross spider?
This is probably Araneus diadematus, the "cross spider," but without a dorsal (top side) image I can't be certain. This is the underside we are seeing, and ventral markings are very similar among all orb weavers. The cross spider is overwhelmingly abundant in western Oregon, though, which is why I lean toward that species.

 
Cross Spider?
Thanks Eric - I've been unable to get a dorsal view, because she is up against the wall of the house and only presents her underside for viewing... I'll keep trying!

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