Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

National Moth Week photos of insects and people. Here's how to add your images.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#326527
Latrodectus geometricus? - Latrodectus hesperus - female

Latrodectus geometricus? - Latrodectus hesperus - Female
Coyote Hills Regional Park, Alameda County, California, USA
August 29, 2009
Size: ~ 6 mm
Found in a public bathroom (!) I didn't think this species got this far north, but it looks like it might be L. geometricus? I think it's a female, although I can't see the epigynum well. Sorry about the over-exposed images.

Images of this individual: tag all
Latrodectus geometricus? - Latrodectus hesperus - female Latrodectus geometricus? - Latrodectus hesperus - female Latrodectus geometricus? - Latrodectus hesperus - female Latrodectus geometricus? - Latrodectus hesperus - female

Moved
Moved from Widow Spiders.

Moved
Moved from Brown Widow.

Moved
Moved from Widow Spiders.

Latrodectus geometricus. same
Latrodectus geometricus. same for all in this set.

Moved
Moved from Cobweb Spiders.

Might be
I can't tell from the epigyne picture whether it's an adult, but maybe it could be L. geometricus. They have an orange-colored hourglass, usually complete as far as I know. This one's is a little lighter than the orange I've seen (I have a live one in a jar on my desk), but I'd bet on that species rather than L. hesperus if this is a mature spider. Have you got it in a jar? Might be worth keeping and watching for a while, in case it still has another molt left. Nice find!

 
Thanks, John -
It's in alcohol... Will move to genus page for now.

 
Immature L. hesperus?
One of my local spider experts tells me that L. geometricus hasn't made it this far north in CA, so likely an immature L. hesperus...

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.