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Photo#327454
Pawnee Montane Skipper - Hesperia leonardus - female

Pawnee Montane Skipper - Hesperia leonardus - Female
Lazy Gulch (Just west of Deckers), Jefferson County, Colorado, USA
August 31, 2009
This is the threatened Pawnee Montane Skipper (Hesperia leonardus montana). I participated in the Forest Service's annual survey for this butterfly today in the South Platte River drainage (only place this subspecies exists). This female was observed exhibiting ovipositing behavior on blue gramma grass. The survey involved walking diamond shaped transects and counting live and dead trees, and liatris sp. flower spikes; recording the presence or absence of blue gramma grass every 20m and of course counting skippers.

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Pawnee Montane Skipper - Hesperia leonardus - female Pawnee Montane Skipper - Hesperia leonardus - female

Moved
Moved from Leonard's Skipper.

So exciting!
Wow, congratulations and commendation for on finding and photographing this subspecies! What a thrill to see something endangered, help record it, and participate in its conservation.

My most-endangered species sightings have been two rare birds, they made my heart race and my eyes water up at the same time. Thrilling, humbling, and inspiring. I do what I can to participate in their conservation now, too.

And how many of the beauties did you count?
now that you have our interest piqued...

 
I think my two person team...
probably counted 3 or 4 officially. We had to be sure of the ID to count it and of individuals (not the same one moving around). I was not keeping the record, so I'm not positive how the Forest Service guy wrote it down. I was excited, though, because the team I was on last year didn't see any.

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