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Photo#327654
Argiope - Argiope trifasciata - male

Argiope - Argiope trifasciata - Male
Sand Springs, Osage County, Oklahoma, USA
August 31, 2009
Size: 10mm (3/8")

Images of this individual: tag all
Argiope - Argiope trifasciata - male Argiope - Argiope trifasciata - male Argiope - Argiope trifasciata - male Argiope - Argiope trifasciata - male Argiope - Argiope trifasciata - male

Genus info page
I've used the image on the genus info page. Thanks!

Moved
Moved from Spiders.

male trifasciata vs. aurantia
I think your spider above is the Banded Garden Spider, Argiope trifasciata. The main reason is that it has no 'shoulders'. A. aurantia seems to have pointy shoulders. Compare with another of your images here:


I can't be 100% sure that a juvenile aurantia may not have pronounced shoulders, but it's the only way I've been able to see a significant difference between the two (and you have both sp. in OK). Yours seems to be an adult, so I think the ID I'm giving is correct.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

We were suggesting the possibility of male
based on size, shape, pattern, and proportions. But wander through the images and see what you think. We're more concerned about those dark legs - very confusing.

 
Ok, so....
I started wondering if the image colors and light/dark were really an accurate representation of the spider. I wanted to be sure that what we think we're seeing is what we are really seeing. So, I decided to see if I could find it again today (two days later). I remembered the location where I found it and it was in an open area in the woods about 1/8 of a mile or so from my house. The spider was in an area full of stringy grasses, weeds, and leaf litter. The odds of finding this relatively small spider, given the additional problems of the spider resembling much of the grasses, the time lapse, and closeness to dark, are astronomical (ok, maybe not astronomical, but still....). So off I went with camera in hand and found the area. However, finding the spider wasn't quite as easy. I was looking in an area about 6' x 6' that I knew if I was going to find it, it would be in this area. I searched for about 30 minutes with the Sun falling further and further toward, and finally past, the horizon. The mosquitoes were thick and on me like thigh fat on a Dixie Chick but I didn't quit! Then FINALLY, when I thought all hope was lost, there it was!! YEEEHAAW!! "I'm too sexy for my shirt, too sexy for my ...." Oh....sorry....got carried away there.
Was that a little over dramatic? I can never tell....

Anyway I have added some additional pics.
It is definitely male and the legs are definitely dark.

Yes, male?
Looks like trifascata, but the legs are so dark??

 
....
How did you determine male with out seeing palps ? Size ?

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