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Photo#329991
Appalachian Tiger Swallowtail? - Papilio appalachiensis - male

Appalachian Tiger Swallowtail? - Papilio appalachiensis - Male
Erbie - Buffalo National River, Newton County, Arkansas, USA
April 21, 2003
This comment, in part, from Wright and Pavulaan:
"Both Harry and I are absolutely amazed at the photo you sent. It truly looks like appalachiensis. At the least, it could be some canadensis-glaucus hybrid from a past glacial age. But we suspect it is appalachiensis."

These comments from Ron Gatrelle:
"This does look like appalachiensis except that the inner black stripe next to the abdomen on the HW looks narrow. But it is narrowish in some Appys. I can't judge the size - that would be the final straw. Another character is that in Easterns the outer edge of the HW is more undulate. In Appy these lobes at the ends of the veins are not present. There are many similar species in the Ozark and Appalachian regions - as you know. So this would not be unexpected. Here is the ultimate proof you all need - an Appy female."