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Photo#331822
Moths hatched from these larvae - Pyramidobela angelarum

Moths hatched from these larvae - Pyramidobela angelarum
Alameda County, California, USA
September 2, 2009
Size: 0.413 in. (10.5 mm)
Four or five adults have developed from the mystery larvae, . This is the first one to emerge. It appeared in the container on September 2, morning.

Captions for these images of other larvae: and tell more about the seasonality of the species.

shows a pupa of the species. Photos of the pupal case are linked.

Images of this individual: tag all
Ventral view - Pyramidobela angelarum Droppings - Pyramidobela angelarum Another moth - Pyramidobela angelarum Moths hatched from these larvae - Pyramidobela angelarum Moths hatched from these larvae - Pyramidobela angelarum Moths hatched from these larvae - Pyramidobela angelarum White larva, Part 2 - Pyramidobela angelarum White larva, Part 2 - Pyramidobela angelarum White larva, Part 2 - Pyramidobela angelarum White larva, Part 2 - Pyramidobela angelarum White larva, Part 2 - Pyramidobela angelarum White larva, Part 2 - Pyramidobela angelarum Another moth - Pyramidobela angelarum

great to see these ID'd at last!
I'm glad we finally found out what they are - your series is terrific, and the documentation of the life stages of a known species is an important contribution.

 
Thanks!
Since you've done life cycles, I don't need to tell you that rearing specimens is a lot of work, keeping containers clean and so on. I learned a few things that may or may not be documented elsewhere. The larvae will rarely or never be seen in normal garden conditions--they don't come out in daylight. They live between leaf buds when small and in rolled leaf edges when bigger. They also pupate in rolled leaf edges, and consequently the transition from larva to pupa takes place secretly unless a gardener goes around peeling back leaf edges.

Wasps and birds eat them.

Moved
Moved from Moths.

 
Thanks, but . . .
I would have moved them myself, on seeing the ID confirmed, and not got so many e-mails.

 
Sorry
Many people don't take care of their own images, so I tend to move them as soon as an ID comes up--especially moths, since we have so many hundreds of unidentified images--rather than waiting to see what happens. If this is a recurring problem for you, you might consider getting a Gmail account for BugGuide purposes. In Gmail, all messages with the same subject show up as a single line, so it's not a big deal if someone moves a dozen linked images to a new place in the guide.

0961.1 - Pyramidobela angelarum
Confirmed by Jerry Powell at U. Cal. Berkeley who states: "You cannot grow Buddleia here without getting the worms, which crumple all the vegetative tips and stunt plant growth. Probably a native of Mexico."

Moved