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Photo#33469
cowling-pronotum beetle - Dialytes striatulus

cowling-pronotum beetle - Dialytes striatulus
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
July 31, 2005
Size: 4 mm
Close-up of top of head and pronotum.

Images of this individual: tag all
cowling-pronotum beetle - Dialytes striatulus cowling-pronotum beetle - Dialytes striatulus cowling-pronotum beetle - Dialytes striatulus cowling-pronotum beetle - Dialytes striatulus

Dialytes striatulus
This is Dialytes striatulus - one of the Aphodiine Scarabs. Two characters to assist in ID - antenna of course (get you to Family), but more importantly, the foretibia have the teeth essentially obsolete (to genus) - detail shot available?. This sp. was originally described as a Trox!

 
I wouldn't have guessed!
Of course I didn't get any good shots of the antennae, which might have clued me in. As for detail shots of front tibia, I just checked my raw images and there are none. Conceivably this individual is in alcohol and I can get a shot of the front tibia.

Thanks for tracking down the ID. I'll see if I can find some info on the biology of this species.

 
Dung beetles
They're dung feeders - I find them rarely in SC, seem to be more common up north. I used to find them frequently in MI feeding on horse dung. I don't believe much is written about them. There is a related genus up in your neck of the woods; Dialytellus spp. - similar habitus, pronotum with basal angles obliterated, but has the foretibia with normal compliment of teeth.

 
That helps me
recall how I came upon this beetle. It was in my dung beetle pitfall, located beneath the exhaust port of my dung aroma supercharger. I assumed that, like the occasional cara*bid or (once) Prio*nus lati*collis that fell into the trap, this beetle was drawn by happenstance, not the smell of dung. I guess I was wrong!

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