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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#33698
really big hornet? - Vespula vidua

really big hornet? - Vespula vidua
Jim Thorpe, PA 18229, Carbon County, Pennsylvania, USA
October 2, 2005
Size: 1 inch approx.

Images of this individual: tag all
really big hornet? - Vespula vidua - female really big hornet? - Vespula vidua really big hornet? - Vespula vidua really big hornet? - Vespula vidua

I'm curious as to why it appe
I'm curious as to why it appears to be kick-boxing a Vespula maculifrons worker. Are they fighting over some kind of food source?

 
I had them cooled down a bit
I had them cooled down a bit to calm them and they just didn't seem like waking up so close to each other. not sure. I cooled them ait as they were really angry and I wanted to make a comparison photo.

Wait-they are not the same species?

Jo

 
Not even the same subgenus...
And members of the rufa-group (like V. vidua) are especially hostile to members of the vulgaris-group (like V. maculifrons). They simply can't "smell" each other, so your explanation is correct. Moreover, being chilled makes Hymenopterans especially defensive, as if they were "aware" they can't flee on the wing.

 
woah I have to look for the slight differences
You know I see a dozen or two Black and Yellow hornets and figure they are all the same thing-I'm learning alot.

Is chilling them bad for them-they didn't seem to be effected by it much-they just got calmer to photograph. The small one took aff really quickly-the big one stayed for some better photos.

If chilling them is okay-I'll do that to get to better photos-If I have to-none of them like to sit still very long.

and the aggressivness explains why I've been seeing them fighting so much. Different species-duh on me.

thanks

Jo

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