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Photo#337870
Cross Orbweaver - atypical pattern - Araneus diadematus - female

Cross Orbweaver - atypical pattern - Araneus diadematus - Female
Puyallup, Pierce County, Washington, USA
September 27, 2009
I always check the orb weavers hoping to find one that isn't an Araneus diadematus, and yesterday I thought I had found one. However, based on the epigynum I'd say it's another Araneus diadematus. This one just is missing its cross.

Images of this individual: tag all
Cross Orbweaver - atypical pattern - Araneus diadematus - female Cross Orbweaver - atypical pattern - Araneus diadematus - female Cross Orbweaver - Araneus diadematus - female Cross Orbweaver - Araneus diadematus - female

Moved
Moved from Araneus.

Thanks Kevin, I was just waiting for someone to agree with me.

 
It's a very common spider her
It's a very common spider here in Germany; right now several people in our German forum are collecting color and pattern variations, which as in so many of the Araneus species, are quite extensive.

-K

 
Atypical pattern
I'm not sure how many of these I've seen this season. At least a hundred I guess. So, this atypical pattern may occur here in less than 1% in our area. Diadematus are abundant here in western Washington, but I haven't seen one in western Montana.

Araneus diadematus
Hi, Lynette-

Is there a reason that you've only got the common name, so far? The epigyne (and spider) certainly looks like Araneus diadematus to me.

-K

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