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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#338345
Green and Red Caterpillar - Paonias myops

Green and Red Caterpillar - Paonias myops
Illinois, USA
October 1, 2004

Images of this individual: tag all
Green and Red Caterpillar - Cat eyed sphinx - Paonias myops Green and Red Caterpillar - Paonias myops Green and Red Caterpillar - Paonias myops

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

But excaecatus seems to have a
white line down the face which we don't see here, so we were thinking myops which does feed on members of the Rose family, and Quince is in that family. That plain green face says myops to us (for what that's worth!)

 
could be
There is also the absence of the subdorsal line on the thorax, which speaks P. myops. I might add that P. excaecatus also feeds on members of the Rose family. Either way it's hard to tell.

-
sooooooo beautiful.

Maybe a Blinded sphinx, or a
Maybe a Blinded sphinx, or a Small eyed sphinx? I'm puzzled. Hopefully Jon and Jane, or other experts can sort it out.

 
yes
It's one of those, I cant find records of either feeding on quince, but both species are generalists, Paonias excaecata more so I'd say. Because of this and the light bluish color (a color form of P. excaecata that I'm familiar with) I'm leaning much more towards that species. I am unaware of P. myops having a light blue color form.

 
quince is closely related to pear..
so close you can graft to it, what a beauty this is.

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