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Photo#3385
Bee Fly - Exoprosopa decora

Bee Fly - Exoprosopa decora
Kennebunk, Maine, USA
July 31, 2002
I had trouble with ID of fly...see photo #00013521. About 15mm long.

Another closer match
Exoprosopa calyptera appears even closer: CalPhotos images
OK, I'm convinced it's Exoprosopa now. I'll place it there.

Agreed
The large eyes threw me, but it clearly resembles Exoprosopa images. Here's one from Cedar Creek. Probably not that particular species since the patterns don't match all that closely and Arnett (1) counts 43 species for that genus. I just don't trust myself with flies!

Maybe a bee fly
I agree it looks somewhat like a bee fly but the large eyes remind me more of a horse/deer fly (which also may have patterened wings). I don't know if they nectar at flowers though. I moved this to ID request to see what others might think.

 
Yes, Bombyliid, maybe Exoprosopa?
See Giff Beaton's excellent Bee-fly page:
http://www.giffbeaton.com/Bee%20Flies.htm

Also, Insects of Cedar Creek:
http://cedarcreek.umn.edu/insects/album/029040044ap.html

I think it is not Anthrax nor Xenox.

I like the looks of Exoprosopa on those sites, but gosh, Bombyliids are hard. That is, if it is in that family. I don't think horse and deer flies visit flowers, but I'm certainly no expert.

OK, I am going to have to post some puzzling moths for you all to cogitate on. Maybe next week.

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