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Photo#338533
Tibicen robinsonianus - Neotibicen robinsonianus - male

Tibicen robinsonianus - Neotibicen robinsonianus - Male
Tuscumbia, Colbert County, Alabama, USA
August 4, 2009
This cicada was collected under lights (12:00 am CDT)

Images of this individual: tag all
Tibicen robinsonianus - Neotibicen robinsonianus - male Tibicen robinsonianus - Neotibicen robinsonianus - male

Tibicen robinsonianus (MALE)
This species may be common across its range, but specimens are often difficult to obtain due to the habits of the adults.

An interesting note with regards to this species involves the white bar connecting the paired pruinose spots at the base of the abdomen. This character is more frequently seen in males (as seen in this specimen). Although a common recurring trait seen in several species of Tibicen, with regards to T. robinsonianus, this trait appears to be present in the more western populations and lacking (perhaps rare) in eastern populations.

It's also worthy mentioning that robinsonianus and linnei are very similar in appearance and easily confused. The "white bar" trait seen in some robinsonianus males thus far seems absent in T. linnei! (*This observation is based on a review of T. linnei specimens from across the latters range, larger sample sizes may be more revealing).

 
this pruinos bar can be found
this pruinos bar can be found in pruinosus! i have seen a few with a thin line wen i was a child. this species does look like T.linnei to a T minus the black veins and white bar. however not all of theese have this barr. they are easy to obtain in one area of illinois. litchfeild IL cemetery only. i think i found their northwest most range in raymond IL. a very nice looking cicada as well. i hope to obtain as many as i can next week. they seem to stratify in and around conifers only

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