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Subfamily Scymninae

 
 
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Hyperaspis and Brachiacantha (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae):two poorly known genera of native lady beetles in the Maritime Provinces
By C.G. Majka & S. Robinson
J. Acad. Entomol. Soc. 5: 3-11, 2009
Key to 10 spp. of Hyperaspis and 2 spp. of Brachiacantha provided and illustrated with habitus photos.
Full text

Hyperaspidius venustulus (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): a rarely collected lady beetle associated with the mealybug.
By Wheeler Jr., A.G.
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 112(1): 149-154., 2010
BioOne

Wheeler Jr., A.G. 2010. Hyperaspidius venustulus (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): a rarely collected lady beetle associated with the mealybug Dysmicoccus dennoi Kosztarab on big cordgrass, Spartina cynosuroides (Poaceae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 112(1): 149-154.

Discovery of a New World ladybird beetle Nephaspis indus Gordon, 1996 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Scymnini) on the Island of ...
By Xiaosheng Chen, Xiufeng Xie, Shunxiang Ren, Xingmin Wang
Biodiversity Data Journal 4: e10537, 2016
Full title: Discovery of a New World ladybird beetle Nephaspis indus Gordon, 1996 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Scymnini) on the Island of Taiwan
Full text (PDF)

The Brachiacantha (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of Illinois
By H.W. Montgomery, Jr. and M.A. Goodrich
Transactions of the Illinois State Academy of Science 95(2): 111-130, 2002
6 spp. known from IL keyed, described, illustrated with habitus photos, and discussed.
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Lady beetles as predators of insects other than Hemiptera.
By Evans, E.W.
Biological Control 51: 255-267., 2009
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Evans, E.W. 2009. Lady beetles as predators of insects other than Hemiptera. Biological Control 51: 255-267.

(Or: Evans, E.W. Lady beetles as predators of insects other than Hemiptera. Biological Control (2009), doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2009.05.011)

Abstract:

Entomophagous lady beetles often prey on a variety of insects in addition to the Hemiptera (Sternorrhyncha) for which they are well-known natural enemies. Many species (particularly those well-adapted for consuming aphids) appear opportunistic in their use of non-hemipteran prey.

Nutritional aspects of non-prey foods in the life histories of predaceous Coccinellidae.
By Lundgren, J.G.
Biological Control 51(2): 294–305., 2009
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Lundgren, J.G. 2009. Nutritional aspects of non-prey foods in the life histories of predaceous Coccinellidae. Biological Control 51(2): 294–305.

Abstract (part):

Non-prey foods are an integral component of the diets of most predaceous coccinellids. Under field conditions, numerous coccinellids consume nectar, honeydew, pollen, fruit, vegetation, and fungus. These non-prey foods are used by coccinellids to increase survival when prey is scarce, reduce mortality during diapause, fuel migration, and enhance reproductive capacity.

Ecology and behaviour of the ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae).
By Hodek, I., H.F. van Emden & A. Honěk (eds).
Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Chichester, UK, xxxvii + 561 pp., 2012
Hodek, I., H.F. van Emden & A. Honěk (eds). 2012. Ecology and behaviour of the ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae). Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Chichester, UK, xxxvii + 561 pp.

from publisher's website:

Ladybirds are probably the best known predators of aphids and coccids in the world, though this greatly underestimates the diversity of their biology. Maximising their impact on their prey is an important element in modern conservation biological control of indigenous natural enemies in contrast to the classical approach of releasing alien species.

Causes and consequences of ladybug washups in the Finger Lakes region of New York State (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).
By Denemark, E. and J. Losey.
Entomologica Americana, 116: 78-88., 2010
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Denemark, E. and J. Losey. 2010. Causes and consequences of ladybug washups in the Finger Lakes region of New York State (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Entomologica Americana, 116: 78-88.

Abstract.—We searched for and collected data on a phenomenon known as ladybug washups, in which large numbers of coccinellids aggregate on the shores of major bodies of water. Our field season lasted from 5/23/2008 until 8/12/2008 in the Finger Lakes Region of New York, United States.

 
 
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