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Species Libellula forensis - Eight-spotted Skimmer

Libellula forensis -- Eight-spotted skimmer (male) - Libellula forensis - male Eight-spotted Skimmer? - Libellula forensis - female Eight-spotted Skimmer - Libellula forensis - male Eight-Spotted Skimmer - Libellula forensis - male Libellula forensis Dragonfly - Libellula forensis - male Eight-spotted Skimmer - Libellula forensis - female Dragonfly - Libellula forensis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies)
Suborder Anisoptera (Dragonflies)
Family Libellulidae (Skimmers)
Genus Libellula
Species forensis (Eight-spotted Skimmer)
Other Common Names
Six-spot
Explanation of Names
Years ago many children refered to this as the "Six-spot", and counted the basal spots as two crossing the thorax, instead of four separate spots. The same went for the then "Ten-spot", which most recent books have switched to calling the "Twelve-spotted Skimmer". The "Six-spot" name doesn't seem to appear in any books, but was likely rationalized from comparison with the "Ten-spot" that was to be found in many books. Back then, Libellula forensis didn't seem to have an established published common name yet.
Range
West of Canadian & U.S. Rockies.
Internet References