Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

BugGuide is a National Moth Week Partner. How to add your National Moth Week 2021 photos. July 17-25.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#341041
Caterpillar or grub?

Caterpillar or grub?
Johnston, Providence County, Rhode Island, USA
October 6, 2009
Size: ~ 2"
A neighbor friend of mine brought this to me from his sister's garden in the next town, only about two miles from me. She found it while digging down about 2 inches into the garden soil. It was near a rotted stick, underground. I recently learned that some caterpillars go underground during metamorphosis. If I did not know that, I'd think it was one of the largest grubs I've seen! I turned it gently to show the underside in one photo. It was constantly active, undulating along. I covered it with some soil in my garden, but it quickly emerged. We left it as you see in the final photo, stretching vertically near some plants. ID?

Images of this individual: tag all
Caterpillar or grub? Caterpillar or grub? Caterpillar or grub? Caterpillar or grub? Caterpillar or grub? Caterpillar or grub?

Moved
Moved from ID Request. Not clear to me what the best ID was for this specific larva so I moved to subfamily.

longhorn beetle larva
*

 
longhorn beetle larva
Thank you all! I love this site. You all have identified what is killing the trees in our yard!

 
has Anoplophora glabripennis
has Anoplophora glabripennis been found in RI?

 
has Anoplophora glabripennis been found in RI?
Thank you for your question, Drew. It prompted me to search the Guide section of this site and lead me to this: "Asian Longhorned Beetle - COLLECT THIS (Anoplophora glabripennis)" quotes are mine. I'd never seen "COLLECT THIS" before. I clicked on this phrase and was lead to the "Info" page. Wow! It matters because IF what I photographed and submitted IS Anoplophora glabripennis, then, we could have a species from Asia that has decimated trees in Mass., NY and NJ!

I called a person via the website address that was on the USDA link on this same "Info" page. Here is the address that lead me to call what I learned is a tri-state (CT, RI, MA) NRC office that is intensely interested to know of any possible new finds of what they refer to as the Asiatic Longhorn Beetle or ALB: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/alb/alb.shtml

The person I spoke with felt this was worth a "field trip" to the home where this larva was uncovered. He did think it odd that this species would be found underground.

v belov's posting "but A.g. would never settle for other than live trees and don't feed on subterranean parts, either -- these must be Prionus laticollis kids, i suspect (a very common large longhorn who lives mostly below ground)
… v belov, 7 October, 2009 - 4:23 pm" is significant.

The larva I photographed WAS found about 2 inches underground near a decomposing small tree branch. Many thanks to you, v belov. I think your comment is going to solve the ID of this creature and bring a sigh of relief.

A couple of years ago I submitted photos of an ADULT Prionus laticollis. I found them by copying and pasting it's Latin name into the Search box. This lead me to searching the Images section and I found the photos I'd submitted in 2008. It was ID'd as an Adult Broad-necked Root borer Prionus laticollis. Photo#227416 VERY LARGE BEETLE ON CONEFLOWER LEAF Copyright © 2008 Marcia Sessions

The comment with it is: "I think this is Prionus latic
I think this is Prionus laticollis. Definitely Prionus though.
… William Ericson, 21 September, 2008 - 1:42pm"

So, I'll pass all of this along to the tri-state NRC person tomorrow. He may still want to visit the yard where this larva was originally found. Hopefully, it will be the common Prionus laticollis! Finding it underground is a significant clue. Is there anything more to look for at the site, v belov? This larva was found just yesterday (Oct. 7th). Would digging around to find another be worth the effort? If a live larva specimen IS found, what to do with it? (I think the NRC official would know, but I'd like your thoughts too).

Whew! I certainly have learned a lot and will pass along the conclusions from the officials seeking the ALB. AND, this official was not aware of BugGuide.Net. He logged onto it as we talked this morning and was very impressed, as he should be! Again, many thanks to all,
Marcia

 
What to look for
See page 2 of this document for signs of Asian long-horned beetle to look for. But again, that species would pupate within a live tree, aboveground, so you would never find the larva underground or outside of a tree. I'm sure =v= is right about this larva being Prionus.

 
i don't know ---
...but how is that relevant to this image?

 
Well Marcia said it was huge
Well Marcia said it was huge but I don't think it had a size on the description. A. glabripennis is a pretty large longhorned beetle, though I'm not sure where all it has invaded at this point

 
oh! i see...
but A.g. would never settle for other than live trees and don't feed on subterranean parts, either -- these must be Prionus laticollis kids, i suspect (a very common large longhorn who lives mostly below ground)

 
oh! i see...
Seems to be what you ID'd it at the start, Prionus laticollis. In the Guide in the Prionus section are photos I took in 2008 which show the very large adult.

I added the photos of the root as it had been beside the larva, both about 2" below ground. Many thanks for your help. I am very relieved it is not the Asian Longhorn Beetle!

Thank you to everyone who contributed to identifying this larva. I really appreciate all the input. I have learned a lot: I had not heard of the infestation of the ALB before this larva was brought to me.
Marcia

 
Ah ok no wonder you were conf
Ah ok no wonder you were confused as to why I mentioned that. I wasn't even thinking about where it was found, just the size. Thanks for the clarification

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.