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Species Acrolepiopsis heppneri - Hodges#2490.1

caterpillar - Acrolepiopsis heppneri caterpillar - Acrolepiopsis heppneri moth - Acrolepiopsis heppneri moth - Acrolepiopsis heppneri Acrolepiopsis heppneri (likely) - Acrolepiopsis heppneri Acrolepiopsis heppneri (likely) - Acrolepiopsis heppneri Micro - Acrolepiopsis heppneri Acrolepiopsis heppneri
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Yponomeutoidea (Ermine Moths and kin)
Family Glyphipterigidae (Sedge and False Diamondback Moths)
Subfamily Acrolepiinae (False Diamondback Moths)
Genus Acrolepiopsis
Species heppneri (Acrolepiopsis heppneri - Hodges#2490.1)
Hodges Number
2490.1
Explanation of Names
Author: Gaedike, 1984.
Life Cycle
1.larva 2.caterpillar with lacy cocoon 3.pupa with lacy cocoon 4.adult 5.lifecycle collage including leaf damage
Remarks
One of two univoltine species of Acrolepiopsis that feed on Smilax tamnoides in Illinois. Unlike A. incertella, which occurs as a larva in early May (central Illinois), the larva of A. heppneri feeds in late summer and early autumn. Both species overwinter in the adult stage. (Comment by Terry Harrison).