Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Interested in a 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico?

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Species Acrobasis minimella - Hodges#5657

Catastega or Acrobasis? on Quercus stellata - Acrobasis minimella St. Andrews leaf miner on Quercus marilandica SA430 2016 2 - Acrobasis minimella St. Andrews leaf miner on Quercus marilandica SA430 2016 3 - Acrobasis minimella Hodges #5657 - Acrobasis minimella - Acrobasis minimella Hodges #5657 - Acrobasis minimella - Acrobasis minimella St. Andrews leaf miner on Quercus nigra SA1052 Acrobasis 2017 1 - Acrobasis minimella Acrobasis minimella Acrobasis minimella - female
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Pyraloidea (Pyralid and Crambid Snout Moths)
Family Pyralidae (Pyralid Moths)
Subfamily Phycitinae
Tribe Phycitini
Genus Acrobasis
Species minimella (Acrobasis minimella - Hodges#5657)
Hodges Number
5657
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Acrobasis minimella Ragonot, 1889
* phylogenetic sequence #167980
Size
Mature larvae to 10.3-15.3 mm(1)
Pupae Length 5.2-6.0 mm(1)
Identification
Larvae - head yellowish white to pale yellow with indistinct pale-brown maculation. Body brownish purple with green undertones; thorax usually greener than abdomen. See Neunzig's complete description(1)

Pupae - Yellowish brown, partially transparent with distinct green undertones(1)
Range
New Jersey south to FLorida and west to Texas(1)
Season
in North Carolina overwinters in the soil as a last-stage larva or prepupa and pupates in late April or early May. Adults emerge from the soil in early May and continue to be present until early June(1)
Food
larval hosts are Oaks. Has been collected from Quercus alba L., Q. borealis var. maxima, Q. falcata, Q. laevis, Q, marilandica, and Q. velutina. Appears to prefer Q. marilandica and Q. alba(1)
Life Cycle
larvae, most at 1 to 3 meters above the soil surface, feeds on the lower epidermis and constructs a very small protective tube from its frass pellets and silk. The tube is enlarged as the larva grows. Only tissue near the opening of the tube is consumed. The larva retreats within its tube and seals the entrance to molt. The tube is never moved. With last-stage larvae the tube is brown, elongate, sinuous, and 35-50 mm. Although the upper leaf tissue is left intact, it turns brown within a few days after the lower tissues are eaten. Larvae are parasitized by Braconid and Chalcid wasps(1)
Internet References
Works Cited
1.Taxonomy of Acrobasis larvae and pupae in Eastern North America (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).
H. H. Neunzig. 1972. USDA Technical Bulletin 1457.