Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinks
Books
Data

Genus Morsea

first page
previous page
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
next page
last page

Orthoptera of Michigan
By Roger Bland
Michigan State University Extension, 2003
Spiral bound, 220 pages. Has 100 or more color photos, mostly of specimens, illustrated keys, life history information. Gives seasonal information for Michigan. Has extensive references and a glossary. Looks very useful for anyone in the eastern or central United States. Luckily, many southern species just reach Michigan, so they are included. Includes all orthopterans, not just grasshoppers--a real plus. My only wish is that the photos were a bit larger.

Available directly from the Michigan State University Exttension service at this page.

Field Guide To Grasshoppers, Katydids, And Crickets Of The United States
By John L. Capinera, Ralph D. Scott, Thomas J. Walker
Cornell University Press, 2004
Finally got a copy--the hardback. It is just stunning. Key features:
* color illustrations of 206 species
* anatomic diagrams and explanations
* range maps
* sonograms
* discussions of identification (including similar species) and ecology
* pictorial key that looks very useful, and accessible to the amateur.

Minor quibbles: There are plenty of illustrations, 206 in color, but there could always be more. (Hey, but then it would be really pricey!) I wish the plates had references to page numbers in the text, but that would make them cluttered and less pretty. (They are lovely as is.) It would be great if there was an accompanying CD with songs, but they do refer to the Singing Insects of North America web site. Perhaps a CD will be published in the future.

Crickets and Katydids, Concerts and Solos
By Vincent G. Dethier
Harvard University Press, 1992
Essays and life histories of New Engleand orthoptera. Has some keys, including a phonetic key to songs, and references.

Grasshoppers and Mantids of the World
By Ken Preston-Mafham
Facts on File, Inc., 1991
Lovely photographs, especially of showy tropical species.

Grasshoppers of Florida (Invertebrates of Florida)
By John L. Capinera, Clay W. Scherer, Jason M. Squiter, Jason M. Squitier
University Press of Florida, 2002
Good color illustrations of 100 species of short-horned grasshoppers (Acrididae) found in Florida. Many of these species are widespread, and range maps cover the eastern US when needed. A lovely book, I only wish I knew more about this family so was able to make better use of it.

New records and notes on the distribution of aquatic insects (Coleoptera, Hemiptera) in southeastern Arizona
By Pintar M.R.
Western N.Amer. Naturalist 84: 125–132, 2024

Review of parasitoid wasps and flies associated with Limacodidae in North America, with a key to genera
By Michael W. Gates, John T. Lill, Robert R. Kula, J,E. O'Hara, D.B. Wahl, D.R. Smith, J,B. Whitfield, S.M. Murphy, & T.M. Stoepler
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, 114(1): 24-110, 2012
Full title: Review of parasitoid wasps and flies (Hymenoptera, Diptera) associated with Limacodidae (Lepidoptera) in North America, with a key to genera.

FULL TEXT

Some results of the University of Kansas entomological expeditions to Galveston and Brownsville, Texas, in 1904 and 1905.
By Snow, F.H.
Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science, 20: 136-154., 1906
Full Text - BHL

Snow, F.H. (1906) Some results of the University of Kansas entomological expeditions to Galveston and Brownsville, Texas, in 1904 and 1905. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science, 20: 136-154.

The writer conducted two entomological expeditions to Texas for the museum of the University of Kansas in the years 1904 and 1905. Each of these expeditions had Brownsville, the extreme southern point of the state, as its objective point, but on account of the wretched connections with the one lone steamer between Galveston and our destination, as well as the limited time at our disposal, we spent the three weeks of our first stay, in May, at Galveston, but succeeded in reaching our original destination by rail in 1905, by the new Gulf Coast line.

first page
previous page
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
next page
last page