Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico, July 20-24

National Moth Week was July 23-31, 2022! See moth submissions.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Photos of insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12


Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#34629
Phidippus pulcherrimus - Phidippus princeps - female

Phidippus pulcherrimus - Phidippus princeps - Female
Weirsdale, Marion County, Florida, USA
September 4, 2005
Size: Immature
I collected an immature regius several years ago that suffered the same fate. Both spiders appeared well fed, but that was not the case.
The spiders become restless before the worm is ready to emerge, and often travel to the nearest water source or damp area. The worm emerges, leaving a dead spider behind, and goes about it's business.
If captive, the nematode suffers the same fate as it's host.
A drop of water was added to give some body to the dried worm.
See also
and

Images of this individual: tag all
Phidippus pulcherrimus - Phidippus princeps - female Phidippus pulcherrimus - Phidippus princeps - female

Whoa!
Poor spider - what a way to go! I love jumping spiders and am sad to see they can suffer such a grisly fate. Great shots, though.

Nice,
interesting and a bit gross as well. Do you know the range of these worms? Oh, my daughter wants to know how the worm gets in there.

 
Hi.
Go to this page and read the info about the life cycle on page 126. It will give you a better answer than I can plus more about mermithids.
http://www.americanarachnology.org/JoA_free/JoA_v13_n1/JoA_v13_p121.pdf

 
Interesting -
I knew that Jerusalem Crickets suffered from a similar pest but not about the spiders. The Jerusalem Crickets often show up in swimming pools because of the compulsion to seek out water (we had one posted that had drowned just the other day) - I wonder if the same is true of the spiders?

 
Maybe so.
Fungus is another more commonly encountered killer of Phidippus and other spiders and insects. I have lost a few great specimens and photo opps as a result of fungal infections in spiders.
A spider might look great one day, and the next day it has a collasped abdomen covered in white fuzz.
In FL, I have not yet encountered fungi in any specimens south of Orlando.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.