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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#347759
Tarantula - Eucteniza relata

Tarantula - Eucteniza relata
Copperas Cove, Coryell County, Texas, USA
October 21, 2009

Images of this individual: tag all
Tarantula - Eucteniza relata Tarantula - Eucteniza relata Tarantula - Eucteniza relata Tarantula - Eucteniza relata Tarantula - Eucteniza relata Tarantula - Eucteniza relata Tarantula - Eucteniza relata

Moved
Moved from Eucteniza.

Moved
Moved from Mygalomorphs.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Which leg pair
Kevin,
It's the front leg adjacent to the pedipalp. It just caught my eye because with the "hook" it closely resembles the leg of my male Texas brown, only much smaller, of course.

Jim, Which leg pair? Do yo
Jim,

Which leg pair? Do you know the significance of this feature (I don't) or did it just catch your eye?

-Kevin

 
Misinterpretation
When I first saw this photo I thought the 'spine' was just the tip of the palp peeking out from behind the leg. But now that I see it is clearly a tibia I leg spine, I agree this spider is probably of the Cyrtaucheniidae family. But, similar to what Kevin commented on the 6th photo, I would love to learn more about what makes this awesome spider a Eucteniza. It seems like some of the things needed for a Eucteniza ID aren't visible, but I am an untrained eye when it comes to most Mygalomorphs.

 
Many, Take a look at this:
Many,

Take a look at this:
Bond, J. E. and B. D. Opell. 2002 Phylogeny and taxonomy of the genera of south-western North American Euctenizinae trapdoor spiders and their relatives (Araneae: Mygalomorphae, Cyrtaucheniidae). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 136(3):487-534.

I don't have the URL handy, but Google should get you there, I think.

-K

 
Thank you, Kevin
It came up in google just fine. Thank you! I am printing it out right now. It seems like every article I feel like printing is always 48 pages. I wonder how it always works out that way. Looks like a trip to the store for some ink cartridges is soon at hand. lol. I have to print longer documents because my eyes can't stand reading that much off a computer screen.

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