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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#348778
Cocoons in the track of my window screen - Isodontia

Cocoons in the track of my window screen - Isodontia
Raleigh, near Rts 50 and US 70, Wake County, North Carolina, USA
October 20, 2009
Size: 22mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Isodontia Cocoons in the track of my window screen - Isodontia Cocoons in the track of my window screen - Isodontia Cocoons in the track of my window screen - Isodontia Isodontia cocoons in the track of my window screen - Isodontia Cocoons in the track of my window screen - Isodontia Isodontia wasp newly hatched.  I mexicana? - Isodontia Isodontia wasp newly hatched.  I mexicana? - Isodontia

Moved

Interesting
This is interesting. I found one last year but it contained only one cocoon. I thought that this was the rule, but it doesn't seem so.

 
The dark membrane ...
... was also present in my cocoon.
Susan

 
Cocoons
I think multiple cocoons are more typical. Krombein et al (1) say that there are three Isodontia species that make nests like this. One makes a large brood chamber containing several larvae; another makes individual nests separated by partitions; and a third usually does the former but sometimes separates the larvae with flimsy partitions. Since the second species is strictly western, we might infer that this is the third species, I. mexicana.

 
North Carolina State University Entomology lists...
North Carolina State University Entomology lists apicalis (7), auripes (21), mexicana (24), philadelphica (14)

Shall I call someone at NCSU? Whom?
Susan Seater

 
...
I. auripes is the species that makes a large brood chamber containing several larvae. I. apicalis and I. philadelphica apparently don't make nests like this.

I have no idea who would be able to make a more definite assessment as to whether this nest was made by I. mexicana (as I'm guessing) or I. auripes. The best thing to do would be to save any intact cocoons and see what comes out.

 
From April 2009 bulletin, Penn State, Steve Jacobs:
When the larvae reach the appropriate size (in 4–6 days at 70–75° F.), they spin a cocoon and pupate. The adult wasps emerge in 2–3 weeks. In Pennsylvania, Isodontia mexicana typically produce two generations per year.

A closely related species, Isodontia auripes, has a similar life cycle and habits. The principal difference is that this wasp will not partition the nest limiting one larva per section, while Isodontia
mexicana creates either a partitioned or a communal nest site for the larvae.

http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/grass-carrying-wasp

So I'll expect to see not the I. auripes with brown legs, but I. mexicana, in less than 3 weeks. I'll keep the cocoons dark but at indoor temperature (65-68F). I hope this experiment hasn't failed by their being in a protected outdoor location until tomorrow when I bring them in. Oh well, there's probably another screen track with them if I check all the windows in the house.

Susan

 
It sounds like 2-3 weeks
is how long after pupation the adults emerge, but I suspect these are overwintering as larvae and will pupate in the spring. So don't lose hope if nothing happens within a few weeks.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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