Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada

Species Amorbia cuneanum - Western Avocado Leafroller - Hodges#3749

Reddish Moth - Amorbia cuneanum - female enormous tortricine - Amorbia cuneanum - female Western Avocado Leafroller - Amorbia cuneanum Western Avocado Leafroller - Amorbia cuneanum - female 3749  Western Avocado Leafroller -  Amorbia cuneana - Amorbia cuneanum Western Avocado Leafroller - Amorbia cuneanum Amorbia cuneanum Amorbia cuneanum
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Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Tortricoidea (Tortricid Moths)
Family Tortricidae (Tortricid Moths)
Subfamily Tortricinae
Tribe Sparganothini
Genus Amorbia
Species cuneanum (Western Avocado Leafroller - Hodges#3749)
Hodges Number
3749
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Amorbia cuneanum (Walsingham, 1879)
Hendecastema cuneanum Walsingham, 1879 (1)
Hendecastema cuneanum var. adumbranum Walsingham, 1879 (1)
Hendecastema adumbrana Walsingham, 1879
Amorbia essigana Busck, 1929
Amorbia synneurana Barnes & Busck, 1920
Phylogenetic sequence #620373
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet from Latin meaning "wedge shaped."
Size
Forewing length: ♂ 10-14.5 mm, ♀ 13.5-17.5 mm. (2)
Range
British Columbia south to northern Baja California. Disjunct population in southern Baja California. (2) Some sources include Arizona and Idaho.
Food
Polyphagous. Larvae often on evergreen shrubs or trees with broad, smooth leaves, manzanita, madrone, avocado, and rarely conifers. (2)
Print References
Walsingham, Lord, 1879. Illustrations of typical specimens of Lepidoptera Heterocera in the collection of the British Museum pt. 4: 4, pl. 61, f. 8-10 (1)
Works Cited
1.North-American Torticidae
Thomas, Lord Walsingham. 1879. Illustrations of typical specimens of Lepidoptera Heterocera in the collection of the British Museum. 4.
2.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.