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Photo#350432
Egg mystery solved! - Leucochrysa insularis - female

Egg mystery solved! - Leucochrysa insularis - Female
Slidell, Honey Island Swamp, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, USA
October 26, 2009
Size: ~1cm (body length)
I collected this female lacewing because she was parasitized (see the dark lump on her abdomen), and I was delighted to find that she laid some very distinctive eggs in the vial overnight. If someone can help me ID her to species, we can clear up the minor mystery of who has been laying this type of egg cluster:

Images of this individual: tag all
Egg mystery solved! - Leucochrysa insularis - female Egg mystery solved! - Leucochrysa insularis - female Egg mystery solved! - Leucochrysa insularis - female Egg mystery solved! - Leucochrysa insularis Egg mystery solved! - Leucochrysa insularis

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Madonna and child?
Is that a nymph near the center right in the photo?

 
Yep
Actually there are two of them caught in her legs. She died not long after laying her eggs, but the nymphs are alive and well.

In the wing photo there is a fruitfly caught under her wings, I don't recall why.

 
Any sign of the parasitoid?
Chrysopophthorus americanus is a braconid parasitoid of adult green lacewings. I think the larva would emerge from its host before spinning a cocoon.

I hope you get an ID on the lacewing, but I wouldn't assume it's the only species that lays eggs in a cluster like this, especially given that a member of a different family does the same. I collected some similar eggs and got little "trash-carrying" larvae out of them, but unfortunately they didn't survive to adulthood.

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