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Photo#352184
Long-horned Orthoptera - Oecanthus fultoni - female

Long-horned Orthoptera - Oecanthus fultoni - Female
Elkton, Douglas County, Oregon, USA
July 25, 2009
tree cricket?

Images of this individual: tag all
Long-horned Orthoptera - Oecanthus fultoni - female Long-horned Orthoptera - Oecanthus fultoni - female

Moved
Moved from Long-horned Orthoptera. This is a 4th or 5th stage instar of a female Snowy tree cricket. Note the uneven white blotches on the abdomen; the black dashes on the antennae; the pale limbs and antennae. It's a female as evidenced by the developing ovipositor.

 
Wonderful
This is the first one I've come across. Didn't know they were in Oregon. As an aside, this one was found hiding in, of all places, an abandoned Misumena vatia nest. Mom and the last of the spiderlings departed just two days earlier.

 
Yes, O. fultoni is fairly widespread.....
...and is found in Oregon. You reminded me, however, that we can't be 100% certain this is not a Riley's tree cricket (which is VERY similar in appearance to Snowy's -- only the antennal markings are slightly different). I do not have any direct experience with Riley's, so I can't say for sure this is not a O. rileyi instar. I'll leave it here in O. fultoni unless it is proven otherwise in the future.

 
Another image
I read where you indicated on another post that the difference can be told by the second antenna segment. I've added a 100% crop of the head. Hope it helps.

 
There isn't enough of the antennal markings
...visible from this angle to make a definite ID. But still, this is a really nice photo.

 
What this cricket would have found,
if it had arrived a day earlier - a Misumena vatia nursery that was vacated on July 24th . . . so either way, I probably would have had a picture of it, only as another dinner guest.

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