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Photo#357315
Whose eggs are these? Chrysopidae. See Leucochrysa insularis.

Whose eggs are these? Chrysopidae. See Leucochrysa insularis.
Raleigh, near Rts 50 and US 70, Wake County, North Carolina, USA
December 8, 2009
Size: Stalk 0.5 inches long
I took a photo last night of the same egg clusters on the glass door on my sheltered porch in 45F rain under a yellow buglight that reflects in the photo along with my camera. I looked at them with a hand lens also. I first noticed the eggs on Nov 16, 3 weeks ago. You can see that the eggs are not pure white anymore but they are not empty either. I also rephotographed the same egg cluster as the other, on a clapboard at the same height, about my eye level. These are still white, although the bug light makes them look golden.

Are they viable? When will they hatch? What can I do to ensure that I see who comes out? Is it a good idea to detach and take them indoors? Please help!

Images of this individual: tag all
Whose eggs are these? Chrysopidae. See Leucochrysa insularis. Whose eggs are these? Chrysopidae. See Leucochrysa insularis. Whose eggs are these? Chrysopidae. See Leucochrysa insularis. Whose eggs are these? Chrysopidae. See Leucochrysa insularis.

Sure looks like there are
lacewing larvae developing inside. I'm not sure if they would be hatching anytime soon in your area (they would certainly be foolish to do so here in New England), but I guess what I would do is put them in a sealed container on the porch--bringing them inside where it's warmer might make them hatch prematurely.

Moved
Moved from Green Lacewings.

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