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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Species Tetraopes pilosus

Tetraopes pilosus Chemsak - Tetraopes pilosus Tetraopes pilosus Some kind of milkweed beetle? - Tetraopes pilosus Some kind of milkweed beetle? - Tetraopes pilosus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Cucujiformia)
Superfamily Chrysomeloidea (Long-horned and Leaf Beetles)
Family Cerambycidae (Long-horned Beetles)
Subfamily Lamiinae (Flat-Faced Longhorns)
Tribe Tetraopini
Genus Tetraopes (Milkweed Longhorns)
Species pilosus (Tetraopes pilosus)
Explanation of Names
Tetraopes pilosus Chemsak 1963
pilosus (L). 'hairy' (1)
Numbers
14 spp. n. of Mex. (2)
Size
11-17 mm (3)
Range
NM-TX-NE-CO (4)
Habitat
sandy uplands (3)
Season
June to August (uncommon) (5)
Food
Sand Milkweed (Asclepias arenaria), Showy Milkweed (A. speciosa and Butterflyweed (A. tuberosa) (3)(5)(4)(BG data)
See Also
Very similar to T. annulatus but body surface including callus completely obscured by dense whitish or yellowish-gray pubescence. (3)

T. annulatus
Print References
Chemsak, J.A. 1963. Taxonomy and bionomics of the genus Tetraopes (Cerambycidae: Coleoptera). University of California Publications in Entomology 30: 1–90.
Farrell, B.D. 1991. Phylogenetics of insect/plant interactions: Tetraopes and Asclepias. Ph.D. Dissertation. Univ. Maryland.
Farrell, B.D., & C. Mitter. 1998. The timing of insect/plant diversification: might Tetraopes (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and Asclepias (Asclepiadaceae) have co-evolved? Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 63: 553–577. (4)
Internet References
Works Cited
1.Dictionary of Word Roots and Combining Forms
Donald J. Borror. 1960. Mayfield Publishing Company.
2.American Beetles, Volume II: Polyphaga: Scarabaeoidea through Curculionoidea
Arnett, R.H., Jr., M. C. Thomas, P. E. Skelley and J. H. Frank. (eds.). 2002. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, FL.
3.Field Guide to Northeastern Longhorned Beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)
Douglas Yanega. 1996. Illinois Natural History Survey.
4.The timing of insect/plant diversification: might Tetraopes (Col.: Cerambycidae) and Asclepias (Asclepiadaceae) have co-evolved?
Farrell B.D., Mitter C. 1998. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 63: 553–577.
5.Illustrated Key to the Longhorned Woodboring Beetles of the Eastern United States
Steven W. Lingafelter. 2008. Coleopterists Society.