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Photo#360960
Dwarf Spider - Souessa spinifera - female

Dwarf Spider - Souessa spinifera - Female
Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
December 26, 2009
Size: 2mm
Found walking on the snow.

Images of this individual: tag all
Dwarf Spider - Souessa spinifera - female Dwarf Spider - Souessa spinifera - female

Moved
Moved from Dwarf Spiders.
Thanks Kevin! Now we have both a male and female Souessa spinifera in the guide.

 
Snow
And we know that they can be found on snow.

-K

Souessa spinifera female
I struggled with this specimen for a while, until I happened to notice that Kaston (1948) had an "epigynum from below" drawing that looked somewhat like what I was seeing (yes, I was paging through) and that this species also happened to be one that Tom had already found (the male). The real clue was that Kaston also included a "posterior aspect of epigynum", which led me to tilt the specimen forward. Boom, that was it --- there was the shield-shaped anterior rim that I had been missing, and suddenly the drawing in Paquin and Dupérré also made sense.

Kaston also helpfully includes a dorsal view of the cephalothorax of the female. The PER is procurved, the AMEs are small and close together, and immediately above (posterior) to them is a small dark fleck. I think you can just see this in Tom's face view.

-K

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