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Photo#367881
Thomisidae -- Misumessus oblongus?

Thomisidae -- Misumessus oblongus?
Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, San Diego County, California, USA
March 8, 1999
Size: Tiny--about 3 mm
This tiny spider was seen on Sugarbush (Rhus ovata - Rhamnaceae) in Hellhole Canyon. It looks similar to some of the BugGuide crab spiders in Misumessus. In Schick,Crab Spiders of California, the description of the female is "Carapcae entirely pale green, fading to pale brown in alcohol. Legs concolorous with carapace. Dorsum of abdomen silvery white or pale green, unmarked." All of this seems to fit. Average length of females, however, is "about 5.5 mm), but this early in spring this may be an immature. Shick writes that "mature individuals have been taken from June through August." Any chance I'm on the right track?

Moved
Moved from Crab Spiders.

Possible Misumessus
Agreed, most likely Misumessus oblongus. However I have yet to see a brown form here in central Texas.

Moved

Moved
Moved from Misumenops.

Moved
Moved from Crab Spiders.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Spiderling
If it is Misumessus oblongus it's certainly a spiderling. I don't see much green, but I don't know the spiderlings of that species have much green either. It does bother me that I don't see the Misumessus genus on Steve Lew's list: Spiders of California.

 
Misumessus = Misumenops?
Not any kind of an expert in this area -- especially not where taxonomy is concerned! But a little poking around online leads me to believe that Misumessus has been renamed Misumenops for many species. I noted that Misumenops oblongus is one of the species included on Steve Lew's list.

 
OK... allow me to offer a slightly different take!
Geez! I knew I should have done a bit more looking around before posting that last comment. So, I just read the note on the Info page for Misumessus oblongus which states that apparently this species was recently (2008) moved from Misumenops. In that case, let me volunteer the information that I have contacted Steve within the last year and he assures me that his list is sadly quite out-of-date and may contain several errors and omissions at this point. Given that, it seems plausible that he has not corrected the list to account for the move of "oblongus" from one genus to another. I guess what I'm trying to say -- and not doing a very good job! LOL! -- is that I wouldn't put too much stock in what is included on his list when it comes to assessing whether this species exists in CA. Sorry for all the confusion on my part!

 
Right!
Misumenops oblongus = Misumessus oblongus. I didn't think of that. Good eye!

I think his list is still a great resource, I just have to keep in mind that it's a couple of years out of date when looking things up. Plenty of my resources are more dated than this one. It's just a matter of remembering the taxonomic changes involved and realizing that over time ranges may change.

 
More range data...
Still looking for other specific references to range in CA, but this page does cite distribution in NM and AZ. (It's a long page, search on "Misumessus" to see the pertinent info.)

 
Misumessus oblongus
Hi and thanks for all your comments. The name change is confusing, to begin with. And, I should have mentioned that Misumenops (Misumessus) oblongus is on Jim Berrian's list for San Diego County. Also, Map 24 of M. oblongus distribution in Schick's Crab Spiders of California includes the western edge of the Colorado Desert, basically where we saw it. It is tiny, probably an immature spiderling?

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