Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#369290
Hyalophora gloveri (Sonoran group) - Hyalophora columbia - male

Hyalophora gloveri (Sonoran group) - Hyalophora columbia - Male
Lake Pena Blanca, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
July 30, 1999
Lake Pena Blanca, Santa Cruz County, AZ
July 30, 1999
Collected at lights
~4:30 am
4,000-5,000 ft. a.s.l.
Coll. Bill Reynolds & Shiloh McCollum

Since "Hyalophora gloveri" does not appear to be very common in the immediate Lake Pena Blanca area, I thought it worthy of inclusion, especially since gloveri specimens from here seem a bit smaller and redder.

It has been my experience that s. Arizona "Hyalophora gloveri" populations are more common at higher elevations, usually above 5,000-6,000 ft. a.s.l.

Examples from Lake Pena Blanca


Additional examples from the Sonoran region of se. AZ


Specimen from a naturally occurring "Hyalophora gloveri" pop.
Hyalophora specimens from southern Arizona often possess characters that are seemingly more congruent with euryalus than with gloveri or often very intermediate between the two (gloveri x euryalus). There has been speculation, these moths may in fact be part of a cline involving a greater species complex composed of columbia, gloveri and euryalus.

NOTE: The individual above is similar in size and appearance to lab produced hybrids (gloveri x euryalus) as seen below.


--------------------

Having collected across southern Arizona for several years, I have noticed that "gloveri" specimens from the Lake Pena Blanca area tend to be slightly smaller and characterized by more of a "washed out red" than those collected from higher elevations and different localities across the "Sonoran" region. However, more studies may be needed to further substantiate this observation.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.