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Photo#369771
anybody got any ideas? - Ufeus satyricus

anybody got any ideas? - Ufeus satyricus
Wolf Creek, Josephine County, Oregon, USA
February 5, 2010
very calm but stubborn. will not show underwings. it walks but doesnt fly or flutter, so i have yet to see what they look like.
i have no idea where to start on thisun.

Images of this individual: tag all
anybody got any ideas? - Ufeus satyricus anybody got any ideas? - Ufeus satyricus

Moved
Moved from Grote's Satyr Moth.

Moved
Moved from Moths.

Probably Protogygia sp.
The date, locality and coloration do not match anything in the 2004 MONA Fascicle. It could be an undescribed species or color form. It will be about a month before I can ask Don Lafontaine for an opinion, as he is at present very tied up with a mass of publication work.

 
what about?
Ufeus? i happened on them at mpg when looking for something else?

 
Ufeus satyricus sagittarius
See comment under other photo.

 
Neat moth!
Saw a Ufeus unicolor on the CBIF site which is a little like bit it, though not quite. Supposed to occur in BC - haven't seen one like it here, though.

Also just checked Powell & Opler (Moths of Western North America). There's a photo of Ufeus satyricus sagittarius on Plate 54.38, which looks a lot like the markings on yours. Says in the text that this subspecies replaces typical U. satyricus throughout the west & is an even dark reddish brown, which would fit.

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