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Photo#376083
Gall Midge - Rhopalomyia audibertiae

Gall Midge - Rhopalomyia audibertiae
Laguna Laurel, Laguna Beach, Orange County, California, USA
March 10, 2010
Size: ~2mm
Reared from gall on White Sage

Images of this individual: tag all
Gall Midge - Rhopalomyia audibertiae Gall Midge - Rhopalomyia audibertiae Gall Midge - Rhopalomyia audibertiae

Moved
Moved from Rhopalomyia.

sage leaf gall midge
Based on Ron Russo's book, this must be Rhopalomyia audibertiae. This is the only sage leaf gall listed. That's a nice adult you got from it!

 
Another sage leaf gall
I checked Gagne (1), and this looks like the right ID for this gall. However, there is another described species, R. salviae Felt, which induces straight, cylindrical, reddish galls on sage leaves. He also states that "sages in western North America evidently support many kinds of galls formed by Rhopalomyia spp., and several kinds are represented in the USNM." --but these two are apparently the only ones that have been described.

 
R. salviae
Yes, actually, Russo lists R. salviae as occurring both on stems and on leaves. Somehow I overlooked that. R. salviae is "straight sided."

Russo writes that Salvia spp. "are considered to host several gall organisms, although I have found only two known species to be common in the California area." He also mentions an undescribed leafy-bract bud gall in southern CA.

It sounds as if there's a lot more to be learned about Salvia galls...

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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