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Books
Data

Tribe Crematogastrini

 
 
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A review of the species of Crematogaster, sensu stricto, in North America (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Part II. Descriptions of ne
By Buren, W.F.
Journal of the Georgia Entomological Society: 3: 91-121, 1968
full title: A review of the species of Crematogaster, sensu stricto, in North America (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Part II. Descriptions of new species

full text, contains separate keys for eastern and western species

A Review of the Species of Crematogaster, Sensu Stricto, in North America (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Part I
By Buren, W.F.
Journal of The New York Entomological Society, 66:119-134, 1958
full text

keys are in part II

The evolution of myrmicine ants: phylogeny and biogeography of a hyperdiverse ant clade (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
By Ward P.S., Brady S.G., Fisher B.L., Schultz T.R.
Systematic Entomology, 2014

The ants of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. (Part I.).
By Wheeler, W.M.
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 24(21): 399-485., 1908
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Wheeler, W.M. 1908. The ants of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. (Part I.), Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 24(21): 399-485.

Although the ant-fauna of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona comprises a greater number of species than that of the whole remaining portion of America north of Mexico, it has never been made the subject of systematic investigation. In the following study I have brought together the scattered and rather meager materials published by previous authors and have added several new forms, especially of Pheidole, a cosmopolitan genus represented by a great number of species in tropical and subtropical America. A residence of four years (1899-1903) in central Texas, several excursions to the Trans Pecos deserts of that State, and a journey through New Mexico and Arizona during the spring of 1905, have enabled me not only to secure the large series of specimens now deposited in the American Museum of Natural History, but also to observe the living ants in their natural environment. This, as every myrmecologist knows, is often of the greatest importance in determining the status of species, subspecies and varieties.

The distribution of ants in Texas.
By O’Keefe, S.T., J.L. Cook, T. Dudek, D.F. Wunneburger, M.D. Guzman, R.N. Coulson, and S.B. Vinson.
Southwestern Entomologist, Supplemental Issue No. 22. 92 pp., 2000
Full PDF

O’Keefe, S.T., J.L. Cook, T. Dudek, D.F. Wunneburger, M.D. Guzman, R.N. Coulson, and S.B. Vinson. 2000. The distribution of ants in Texas. Southwestern Entomologist, Supplemental Issue No. 22. 92 pp.

Abstract

The distribution of 291 known species of Texas ants was recorded from published literature and examination of identified museum specimens. For each species, all counties of known occurrence are given as well as a distribution map...

Ants of Florida: Identification and Natural History
By Mark Deyrup
CRC Press , 2016

The ants of New Mexico (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
By Mackay, W.P. and E. Mackay.
Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, NY. 408 pp., 2002
Full PDF (late draft)

Mackay, W.P. and E. Mackay. 2002. The ants of New Mexico (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, NY. 408 pp.

ABSTRACT
We report a total of 227 species and subspecies of ants from New Mexico, USA, with a listing of another 66 that probably occur in the state. This is about 39% of the species that occur in the United States.

The subfamilies and genera include:
PONERINAE: Amblyopone, Hypoponera, Odontomachus,
CERAPACHYINAE: Acanthostichus, Cerapachys,
PSEUDOMYRMECINAE: Pseudomyrmex,

ANT ECOLOGY
By Lori Lach, Catherine Parr & Kirsti Abbott, editors
Oxford University Press, USA , 2010
This book explores key ecological issues and developments in myrmecology across a range of scales. It begins with a global perspective on species diversity in time and space and explores interactions at the community level before describing the population ecology of these social insects. The final section covers the recent ecological phenomenon of invasive ants: how they move across the globe, invade, affect ecosystems, and are managed by humans. Each chapter links ant ecology to broader ecological principles, provides a succinct summary, and discusses future research directions. Practical aspects of myrmecology, applications of ant ecology, debates, and novel discoveries are highlighted in text boxes throughout the volume. The book concludes with a synthesis of the state of the field and a look at exciting future research directions. The extensive reference list and full glossary are invaluable for researchers, and those new to the field.

 
 
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