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Family Coenagrionidae - Narrow-winged Damselflies

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Odonata at risk in conterminous United States and Canada.
By Bick, G.H.
Odonatologica 12(3): 209-226., 1983
Bick, G.H. 1983. Odonata at risk in conterminous United States and Canada. Odonatologica 12(3): 209-226.

Abstract
32 spp. (8% of the odon. fauna) considered to be at risk in the United States and Canada are assigned to Red Data Book categories as follows: Rare-20 (62%), Vulnerable-5 (16%), Endangered-3 (9%), Insufficiently known-3 (9%), Probably extinct-I (3%). Most (82%) of the threatened spp. are associated with flowing water. The loss of high-quality, undisturbed streams is the most significant actor endangering odonates in the US and Canada. The threatened spp. occur in 3 eastern Canadian Provinces and in 31 states, most of which are east of the Mississippi River.

National review of state wildlife action plans for Odonata species of greatest conservation need.
By Bried, J.T. and C.A. Mazzacano.
Insect Conservation and Diversity 3(2): 61–71., 2010
Bried, J.T. and C.A. Mazzacano. (2010). National review of state wildlife action plans for Odonata species of greatest conservation need. Insect Conservation and Diversity 3(2): 61–71.

Keywords: Conservation; damselflies; dragonflies; rare species

Abstract. 
1. The overarching goal of United States wildlife action plans is to prevent wildlife from becoming endangered or declining to levels where recovery becomes unlikely. Effective plan implementation depends on establishing Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN), defined as wildlife species with small or declining populations or other characteristics that make them vulnerable.

Dragonflies of Texas A Field Guide.
By John C. Abbott.
University of Texas Press, Austin. 466 pp., 2015
Abbott, J.C. 2015. Dragonflies of Texas A Field Guide. University of Texas Press, Austin. 466 pp.

UT Press page

Dragonflies of Texas is the definitive field guide to these insects. It covers all 160 species with in situ photographs and detailed anatomical images as needed.

Each species is given a two-page spread that includes photographs of both sexes and known variations when possible, key features, a distribution map, identification, discussion of similar species, status in Texas, habitat, seasonality, and general comments. Many of the groups also have comparative plates that show anatomically distinctive characteristics.

The classification and diversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata). In: Zhang Z.-Q. (ed.) Animal biodiversity:...
By Dijkstra KDB, Bechly G, Bybee SM, Dow RA, Dumont HJ, Fleck G, Garrison RW, Hämäläinen M, Kalkman VJ, Karube H, May ML, Orr AG
Zootaxa 3703: 036–045, 2013

Dragonflies and damselflies of the East
By D. Paulson
Princeton University Press. 576 pp., 2012

Dragonflies and Damselflies of Oregon - A Field Guide
By Cary Kerst and Steve Gordon
Oregon State University Press, Corvallis, OR, 2011

Dragonflies and Damselfies of Louisiana
By Michael L. Ferro, Katherine A. Parys, Matthew L. Gimmel, Gayle Strickland, Jeanell Strickland
Louisiana State Arthropod Museum, 2010
Celebrate the beauty and diversity of nature with this field guide to Louisiana’s dragonflies and damselflies. This level of detail can’t be found in any other guide currently available; it provides both top and side high resolution scanned images of 118 species of dragonflies and damselflies known from the state of Louisiana and adjoining states. All species are represented by life-sized images, and smaller species are shown as both life-sized and enlarged images. In addition, both male and female specimens are provided for most species. A photographic "head shot" of each species is also included and most species showing variation in color pattern are represented by multiple photographs.

Dragonflies and Damselflies of the West
By Dennis Paulson
Princeton, 2009
Covers all dragonflies and damselflies of western North America north of Mexico. Excellent photos of every species, many figures of appendages and other details needed for identification.

Should cover most species in the east as well (eastern guide due in the next year or so). Might be a bit heavy for carrying around but otherwise looks great.

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