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Photo#380396
Unfamiliar markings - Coccinella trifasciata - female

Unfamiliar markings - Coccinella trifasciata - Female
Alameda County, California, USA
March 29, 2010
Size: ~6.0 mm
Found on yard-waste bin, midday. These markings are new to me. And what are the yellowish things on the white patches on the pronotum?

Images of this individual: tag all
Unfamiliar markings - Coccinella trifasciata - female Unfamiliar markings - Coccinella trifasciata - female Unfamiliar markings - Coccinella trifasciata - female

Moved
Moved from Lady Beetles.

Coccinella; likely, C. trifasciata subversa
with 2 phoretic mites hitchhiking

 
never seen mites match their background so well!
I've seen many photos of lady beetles w/ yellow mites like that on them, but they usually aren't so color-coordinated w/ the part of the beetle they're standing on. I wonder if they know somehow that the white patches are more camoflaging than the red or black areas would be?

I had a personal encounter with an Indian meal moth that kept flying back to the same gray and brown striped shirt and perching so that its gray front end was on a gray stripe and it brown wingtips were on a brown stripe. I have no idea if that was deliberate or just coincidence several times in a row!

 
Thermoregulation, perhaps?
I thought the mites might have settled on the spots with highest reflectance for warmth.

 
that does make more sense!
Wandering around until it finds a warm spot and settling there definitely sounds like a very natural thing to do.

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