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Photo#38068
Stink Bug Nymph - Stiretrus anchorago

Stink Bug Nymph - Stiretrus anchorago
Harvard, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
July 28, 2004
I'm thinking this is probably a Stiretrus anchorago nymph. That's the only species I've found here with all that whitish with the strong black marks. Anyone agree, or disagree?

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Stink Bug Nymph - Stiretrus anchorago Stink Bug Nymph - Stiretrus anchorago

Moved

Moved
Moved from Stink Bugs.

The only info I've seen on Stiretrus nymphs is
this IFAS site which mentions only red and blue-black for the colors. However, the author also refers to them as larvae, which definitely strikes a wrong note!

 
Color forms
That site mentions a little about a northern subspecies, S. fimbriatus, where I am, that's a light color form. I think they're concentrating on the red and blue-black, which is the common form. Like lots of insects, there's plenty of variation, that causes plenty of confusion. Maybe next time I find one, I'll raise it, and find out for sure.

 
Terminology.
Actually "larva" can be correctly applied to ANY immature insect. I was shocked to learn this myself, but it is not a mistake in any event:-) This nymph might be an immature Perillus sp.

 
Thanks for the info, Eric!
I'm surprised, but relieved that my old standby IFAS is not disseminating wrong information!

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