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Photo#38070
Heteroceridae? - Heterocerus fenestratus

Heteroceridae? - Heterocerus fenestratus
New Hampshire, USA
Size: 4.5 mm
Found somewhere in south-central New Hampshire, probably in 2004. Died before I got around to shooting it, so into the spirits it went. (Don't ask for the strong stuff at my house ;-) Photographed 11/27/05.

Note the spiny comb on the anterior and middle tibia, which is one of the traits of Heteroceridae. The antennae look more clubbed than serrate, but that would place it in Micilini or Elythomerini, niether tribe of which is known from the US. In fact, only tribe Heterocerini is recorded for New Hampshire, with 10 species on the UNH checklist.

Images of this individual: tag all
Heteroceridae? - Heterocerus fenestratus Heteroceridae? - Heterocerus fenestratus Heteroceridae? - Heterocerus fenestratus

Moved

Moved

Heteroceridae, probably Heterocerus.
The only other possible genus would be Augyles (Tropicus is easily separated), which is very rare in New Hampshire. The separation between the genera is a bit imaginary anyway in my opinion.

 
I knew it!
Thanks Don. I've shot three more, one of which I suspect is a different species based on markings and less-hairy underside. I'll post it within the week.

 
Heterocerus fenestratus Thunberg
It's Heterocerus fenestratus Thunberg. You can tell by the elongated basal markings on the elytra. Heterocerus fenestratus was synonimized with Lapsus tristis Mannerheim by A. Mascagni in 1993. My molecular data supports his decision. It seems to be the only representative of the old World fauna present in the Americas. It's the most widespread species of heterocerid Common north of 40 degrees. - Jonas King

 
Who is Jonas King?
I found a partial answer using google, but why not write a line or two at least on your personal page (click on your name to get there) so other curious bugguide users can see who is giving them ID advice.

Thank you so much for the ID explanation above.

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