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Photo#381809
spider - Lepthyphantes turbatrix - male

spider - Lepthyphantes turbatrix - Male
Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
Size: 1.8mm
This is how the spider looks on 4-3-10 after being in captivity to get it matured.

Images of this individual: tag all
immature male spider - Lepthyphantes turbatrix - male spider - Lepthyphantes turbatrix - male spider - Lepthyphantes turbatrix - male spider - Lepthyphantes turbatrix - male spider - Lepthyphantes turbatrix - male spider - Lepthyphantes turbatrix - male

..
Comparing the pedipalp to the drawings in Paquin & Dupérré (2003) and Zorsch (1937), I see (possibly) some very minor variations*, but the specimen is clearly L. turbatrix. Levi writes in "Spiders of Wisconsin" (1954) that the species is fairly common in the northern half of the state, but less so in the southern part.

The type locality, according to Zorsch (1937) is Mt. Adams, White Mountains, N. H.

Images to come...




* Looking at single specimens, one doesn't really have a feel for how much variation within the species is possible.

 
Similar Example
Could you take a look at my similar example here? Thanks!

 
type locality
I found this spider at Wachusett Meadows Mass Audubon sanctuary, right next to Wachusett Mountain ski area. The elevation looks like about 1,300', so that might fit in with the type localities described by Zorsch.

 
Yes, it certainly seems to li
Yes, it certainly seems to like the higher elevations.

-K

Moved
Moved from Sheetweb and Dwarf Spiders.
Kevin, I've got confidence in your call and am moving to species page.

You can call me "Turbatrix".
Pretty sure you've got a new BG species here... and I think it's Lepthyphantes turbatrix (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1877). Will double-check in the morning.

-K

A "-phantes" of some sort, bu
A "-phantes" of some sort, but can't see just now which one.

-K

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