Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar

TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Subfamily Theclinae - Hairstreaks

Brown Eflin - Callophrys augustinus Juniper Hairstreak - Callophrys gryneus Which Hairstreak is this? - Satyrium saepium - female butterfly - Satyrium acadicum Gray Hairstreak - Strymon melinus Another Poling's Hairstreak - Satyrium polingi Sylvan Hairstreak - Satyrium sylvinum Callophrys niphon
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Papilionoidea (Butterflies and Skippers)
Family Lycaenidae (Blues, Coppers, Hairstreaks, Harvesters)
Subfamily Theclinae (Hairstreaks)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Often considered as a tribe - "Theclini" under a broader concept of subfamily Lycaeninae, which also incudes Blues and Hairstreaks, and others, as just tribes.
Remarks
The most notable feature of hairstreaks is the tails on the hindwings. Combined with bright spots that look like eyes, they give the illusion that the back end of the wings is really the head. This fools birds and other visually-oriented predators often enough to increase the hairstreaks' odds for survival.

Here's an example- both are the same species in the same area within a few days of each other:
You can see the fake eyes and antennae on this one:

And this one has survived an attack- it's missing a chunk of its wings, but it's still alive and flying around: