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Photo#383182
Monsoma pulveratum - Green Alder Sawfly - Monsoma pulveratum - female

Monsoma pulveratum - Green Alder Sawfly - Monsoma pulveratum - Female
Vancouver, Clark County, Washington, USA
April 6, 2010
Size: 10 mm
Under red alder tree.

Images of this individual: tag all
Monsoma pulveratum - Green Alder Sawfly - Monsoma pulveratum - female Monsoma pulveratum - Green Alder Sawfly - Monsoma pulveratum - female Monsoma pulveratum - Green Alder Sawfly - Monsoma pulveratum - female Monsoma pulveratum - Green Alder Sawfly - Monsoma pulveratum - female

I agree, nice series
But it would be nice to crop at least one of them tightly so it shows more detail even in thumbnails. I would choose the better quality ones, the others wouldn't make much difference.
Also, when you know the sex it is always a good idea to add that to the data fields.

 
I agree...
and already deleted couple pictures and added the sex information for rest of them. As far as this species is pretty new pest for the PNW I just wanted to illustrate the different sides of its body and life. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to get the better image with all the details, maybe next time...
Thank you Beatriz.

 
Ouch!
There was no need to delete anything. Usually frassing is a better idea because it gives you and others time to think it over.
As for cropping, any of them could be cropped a little to show more bug and less background.
When you say that it is a new pest, where did it come from? If it is new to the Nearctic region I need to add it to the list of non-natives.

 
Monsoma
As far as I know Monsoma pulveratum (Retzius, 1783) or Tenthredo limbata (Gmelin, 1790) is an European species. According to Dave's Smith ID and information it was unknown from PNW (please see his comments here: http://bugguide.net/node/view/381754).

 
Not another one!
Let me know if you find other non-natives so I can add them to the article. Thanks.
Ha! I just realized that it was already in the list; it is hard to keep track because there are so many.

 
Sure...
I'll do.

nice series
**

 
Thank you!
Thank you!

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