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Photo#38570
Here's the bugs - Phymata fasciata

Here's the bugs - Phymata fasciata
Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida, USA
December 2, 2005
Here are the bugs that got the bee...
I am presuming that there is a male and a female here, but the picture is not hardcore enough for me to tell...

Images of this individual: tag all
Here's the bugs - Phymata fasciata Here's the bugs - Phymata fasciata

Moved
Moved from Jagged Ambush Bugs.

Ambush bug - Phymatidae
Great photo of the male and female! These are very unusual insects. I often find them waiting in the herb blossoms waiting to take down halictidae bees.

Our understanding is
that the male is not pwerful enough on his own to take down some of the larger prey items, so he rides around on the back of the female and she sets the table for him! Typical male, eh!

 
So that's what's going on
Recently I've seen several two-bug combos. One pair had captured a fairly large bee which the male was consuming. Although I saw nothing to indicate mating was taking place, I assumed I was seeing an example of ambush bug multi-tasking, but now you tell me it was just typical male freeloading. Thanks for the info -- I think.

Marvin

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