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Photo#390673
Isopod? That bio-luminesces . . . - Photuris

Isopod? That bio-luminesces . . . - Photuris
Sagadahoc County, Maine, USA
Size: 3/4th inch (head out)
Is this an Isopod? I found this little guy in my house at night. I swept it around by accident and then realized that it was a living thing and picked it up (it was all curled up). As I left the room, (with the isopod? in my hand), I turned out the light and noticed the bug in my hand was glowing. It was so bright it light up the area of my hand near the bugs head. I looked closely and noticed that it was glowing from around it's antennas - at the base (see photo of whole body with head and see lighter areas at base of antennas). Later I noticed it also glowed on its underside near the back end. But, unfortunately I couldn't get it to glow again for a photo! I let it go finally as it seemed to be getting anxious in it's mini world I made for it. I'll try to photo one again when I find one - which I will, I've seen several in the area (dead ones with no heads!). Maybe it glowed from a recent food source and then it just ran out of glowing substance? Maybe it knew I was harmless and didn't need to frighten me? Or maybe it only glows very rarely for a mate?

Images of this individual: tag all
Isopod? That bio-luminesces . . . - Photuris Isopod? That bio-luminesces . . . - Photuris

Moved

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

It's a firefly larva,
or, perhaps, a wingless adult female. Others may be able to tell you more.

EDIT: Looks a bit like this one:


 
Thanks Ken
Thanks! That does explain the glowing I'd say. Has anyone else seen a larva like this glow?

 
I've seen tons of them
at bug camp last year! They were out en masse.

 
glowing
Yes, I have seen fireflies glow at all of their life stages. One of the most amazing things I saw in a forest clearing at night was the light from millions of glowing firefly eggs!

 
I'd love to see that!
I'd love to see that!

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