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Photo#394089
Coccinellidae from Madera canyon. Brachiacantha? - Brachiacantha arizonica - male

Coccinellidae from Madera canyon. Brachiacantha? - Brachiacantha arizonica - Male
Madera Canyon, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
May 9, 2010
Size: 4 mm
Hiding in a White leaf oak leaf rolled up by a caterpillar

Images of this individual: tag all
Coccinellidae from Madera canyon. Brachiacantha? - Brachiacantha arizonica - male Coccinellidae from Madera canyon. Brachiacantha? - Brachiacantha arizonica - male Hind sight - Brachiacantha arizonica - male

Moved

B. arizonica
Looks to be B. arizonica Schaeffer, 1908
Only 4 spots (missing or only traces of 5th spot from lateral margin) (Gordon, '84(1))

"Anterior tibia with prominent tooth on outer margin near tarsal insertion, tooth angled inward"
and
"I have seen this species only from Arizona. The round form, confluent humeral and basal spots, and unique form of the outer anterior tibial tooth characterize B. arizonica."
and
Distro: "Cochise Co., Chiricahua Mts.; Palmerlee; Flagstaff; Oak Creek; Globe; Greenlee Co.; Huachucha Mts.; Santa Rita Mts.; Tucson."

You sure got a winner! And another new species for BugGuide :)

 
Hi Tim, thanks!
but "only four spots"? Doesn't it have six? Or do you not count the ones up front on the elytra against the pronotum, the ones that are confluent with the humeral ones?

 
"per wing"
sorry for the confusion. Spots are usually counted "per wing", vice total, meaning this ladybird has 4 per wing, or 8 total. Yes, the confluent basal spots are counted as 2 per wing, plus one on the disk and one more apical = 4 on each wing.

 
thanks!
I've added ventral. Abby asked for it and it makes the post more complete

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Would be my guess, too.
Wow! That really is a spectacular one:-)

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