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Species Coryphaeschna ingens - Regal Darner

Regal Darner - Coryphaeschna ingens Dragonfly - Coryphaeschna ingens Maybe a Regal Darner? - Coryphaeschna ingens Maybe a Regal Darner? - Coryphaeschna ingens Regal Darner - Coryphaeschna ingens - Coryphaeschna ingens Regal Darner - Coryphaeschna ingens Dragonfly spp - Coryphaeschna ingens Coryphaeschna ingens
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies)
Suborder Anisoptera (Dragonflies)
Family Aeshnidae (Darners)
Genus Coryphaeschna (Pilot Darners)
Species ingens (Regal Darner)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Coryphaeschna ingens (Rambur)
Orig. Comb: Aeschna ingens Rambur 1842
Explanation of Names
ingens (L). 'large, remarkable' (1)
Size
Total length: 85-90 mm; abdomen: 64-78 mm; hindwing: 54-60 mm. (OC)
Identification
Has green thorax with wide brown stripes. Similar Swamp Darner has brown thorax with green stripes! Pattern of green on abdomen is different as well--see photos. Eyes green, turning blue in mature females. Swamp Darner has blue eyes.
Larva has flattened head; rear margin (behind eyes) is squared off/rectangular. Abdomen has distinct longitudinal stripes. Other members of this genus have similar larva, but C. adnexa is significantly smaller, C. viriditas restricted to southernmost Florida. (distilled from comments by Steve Krotzer and Dennis Paulson on the SE-Odonata e-mail list)
Range
se US (TX-FL-VA-OK) - Map / Cuba, Bahamas - OC
Habitat
Lakes and slow flowing streams with heavy vegetation. - OC
Season
Feb-Nov, most common in spring
Print References
Dunkle, p. 36, plate 2 (2)
Dunkle, p. 18 (3)
Internet References
Darners - Giff Beaton
Works Cited
1.Dictionary of Word Roots and Combining Forms
Donald J. Borror. 1960. Mayfield Publishing Company.
2.Dragonflies Through Binoculars: A Field Guide to Dragonflies of North America
Sidney W. Dunkle. 2000. Oxford Press.
3.Dragonflies of the Florida Peninsula, Bermuda, and the Bahamas
Sidney W. Dunkle. 1989. Scientific Publishers.