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Species Galerita bicolor

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Evolution of the (Coleoptera) Carabidae of the Southern Appalachians.
By Thomas C. Barr Jr.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute , 1969
pp 67-92 in "The Distributional History of the Biota of the Southern Appalachians. Part I. Invertebrates." edited by P.C. Holt, R.L. Hoffman, and C.W. Hart Jr.

Barr writes on the distribution and natural history of endemic carabid species of the southern appalachians.

Carabidae of Vermont and New Hampshire
By Ross T. Bell
Shire Press, VT, 2015
A lifetime of work on the carabid beetles of Vermont and New Hampshire has reached fruition and is now available in Carabidae of Vermont and New Hampshire by Ross T. Bell, Professor Emeritus of the University of Vermont. Ross Bell is a well-known and well-published expert on Carabidae. He and his wife, Joyce Bell, are the world's leading experts on the carabid tribe Rhysodini, the Wrinkled Bark Beetles, and have described over three quarters of the world's 360 species.

The work will be indispensable to anyone interested in the fauna of New England, ecology, habitats, conservation, distribution, or carabid beetles. It is not an identification manual, but there is a wealth of biological and distributional information beyond what has been currently available, along with 13 new state records or confirmation of catalogue records that were in doubt. An introduction discusses topography, mountains, wetlands, vegetation, soils, life zones, and biophysical regions of Vermont and New Hampshire. A list of species indicates state records, confirmation of catalogue records previously considered tentative, literature records, and adventive species. Names have been updated following Bousquet's 2012 Catalogue. The main text follows with brief tribal and generic summaries and individual accounts of 495 species. Each species account includes general range, local range, habitat, life cycle, behavior and dynamics. References, an index, and Vermont/New Hampshire range maps for all species finish the work.

Ground Beetles from the Quantico Marine Corps Base: 2. Thirty Additional Species from Recent Collections (Coleoptera: Carabidae)
By Richard L. Hoffman
Banisteria Number 36, 2010
PDF
Both this and the first Quantico carabid paper(1) make a good companion to Erwin's classic on the carabids of nearby Plummers Island(2). In both Quantico papers, differences and similarities between carabids found at Quantico and Plummers Island are discussed most thoughtfully.

In this paper Hoffman also discusses the difficulty in telling the difference between Diplocheila assimilis and Diplocheila impressicollis, with new illustrations of [i]D.

Natural History of Plummers Island, Maryland. XXVI. The Ground Beetles of a Temperate Forest Site (Coleoptera: Carabidae):[...]
By Terry L. Erwin
Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington, 1981
Full title:
"Natural History of Plummers Island, Maryland. XXVI. The Ground Beetles of a Temperate Forest Site (Coleoptera: Carabidae): An Analysis of Fauna in Relation to Size, Habitat Selection, Vagility, Seasonality, and Extinction."

PDF

A classic, often-cited work.
Pairs well, for those interested in the carabid fauna of the region, with the papers on carabids of Quantico(1)(2).

Ground Beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) from Quantico Marine Corps Base, Virginia
By John M. Anderson, Joseph C. Mitchell, Adrienne A. Hall, Richard L. Hoffman
Banisteria, Number 6, 1995
PDF
Includes useful comments on microhabitat preference and regional occurrence of each species, with especially useful information on the known ranges within Virginia.
Species discussed here were all captured in pitfalls. Carabid species collected at UV light at Quantico are discussed in Part 2(1).

Five new species of Anillinus Casey from Alabama with a key to the Alabama species (Carabidae: Trechinae: Bembidiini)
By Sokolov, I.M.
Annals of Carnegie Museum 81:61-71, 2012
This remarkably detailed work is available here.

The Ground Beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Fauna of Maine, USA
By Dearborn, R.G., R.E. Nelson, C. Donahue, R.T. Bell, & R.P. Webster
The Coleopterists Bulletin 68: 441 - 599, 2014
This annotated checklist brings the number of ground beetle species in Maine to 425. That's 14 more than previously documented. Included are geographic distributions and bionomics.

12 Ground Beetles New to Virginia or DC & an Annotated Checklist of Geadephaga from George Washington Memorial Parkway
By Brent Steury & Peter W. Messer
Banisteria 43:40-55, 2014
Among the twelve newly reported state records of Ground Beetles is the tiny adventive Elaphropus quadrisignatus new to the Western Hemisphere, specifically captured in the states New Jersy and Virginia. The full article can be searched by entering the first few words of the title and then clicking on the pictured "source" page.

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