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Photo#40232
Unknown Bee - Andrena milwaukeensis - female

Unknown Bee - Andrena milwaukeensis - Female
Calgary, Southern, Alberta, Canada
May 21, 2005
Size: ~ 12 mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown Bee - Andrena milwaukeensis - female Unknown Bee - Andrena milwaukeensis - female

Moved

Andrena (Andrena) milwaukeensis Graenicher female
western populations of this species have very extensively fulvous abdomens whereas in the east most individuals have only T1-2 are fulvous and T3- black.

A. fulva looks very similar and is closely related but is larger

 
Mystery solved
Thanks, once again. I am disappointed and relieved that it is not another alien. Who needs more of those?

Puzzling.
Reminds me of one of the European Andrena spp. Do you know if there have been any such bee species introduced to Alberta? The name that comes to mind is the "rufus mining bee," or something like that.

 
Intriguing
Eric is right, Dr. Vereecken, a European entomologist, confirms that this looks like Andrena fulva, here are some of his images from the Netherlands.
Do you have more images or even a specimen? Have you submitted this finding to the local Agriculture Extension? If it is a European bee found in Canada it is a very interesting finding. I know that this post has been lying dormant for a long time but it is time to do something about it.

 
Answers to questions
I agree that the bee looks similiar to A. fulva. I have the specimen so can take additional photos as required. What do we need to make a more accurate determination? No I have not submitted the bee to Agri Canada for further ID.

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