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Photo#402364
Parasitoid of witch hazel leafroller - Sympiesis - female

Parasitoid of witch hazel leafroller - Sympiesis - Female
Bare Mountain, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, USA
May 28, 2010
Size: 3 mm
Pretty much everything I've tried to rear this spring has produced some sort of chalcid. This one was from a moth larva that rolls witch hazel leaves transversely--based on having collected similar leaf rolls in 2011, I believe the host was Episimus argutanus.

Images of this individual: tag all
Parasitoid of witch hazel leafroller - Sympiesis - female Parasitoid of witch hazel leafroller - Sympiesis - female Parasitoid of witch hazel leafroller - Sympiesis - female

Moved
Moved from Eulophidae.
Christer Hansson: "possibly a Sympiesis, a female"

Moved
Moved from Chalcidoid Wasps.
Thanks--that makes four different eulophids I've reared in the past month.

Eulophidae…
Meets the criteria for this family including antennae with 4-segmented funicle, dark metallic coloration, axilla that extend past the tegula, light sclerotization, and constriction between thorax and abdomen. This one's a female. Many species do parasitize the larvae or pupae of leaf-rolling and leaf-mining Lepidoptera (e.g. Olethreutidae, Nepticulidae, and Pyralidae).

See reference here.

Moved

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